Weekly INT Boost – Much Ado About Science

Welcome to our roundup of the best mental health articles you may have missed. This week, we have fascinating studies about social media use, breathing, and machine learning. We have bujo layouts. We have thoughts on S-Town. And we have bunnies.


A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel

“Overall, our results showed that, while real-world social networks were positively associated with overall well-being, the use of Facebook was negatively associated with overall well-being. These results were particularly strong for mental health; most measures of Facebook use in one year predicted a decrease in mental health in a later year. We found consistently that both liking others’ content and clicking links significantly predicted a subsequent reduction in self-reported physical health, mental health, and life satisfaction.”

Researchers believe that this new longitudinal study shows that Facebook use may actually be involved in negative outcomes, while previous studies have only linked the two correlatively. Harvard Business Review has more.


How Machine Learning May Help Tackle Depression

“A study published in Psychiatry Research earlier this year showed that MRI scans can be analyzed by machine-learning algorithms to establish the likelihood of someone suffering from the condition. By identifying subtle differences in scans of people who were and were not sufferers, the team found that they were able to identify which unseen patients were suffering with major depressive disorder from MRI scans with roughly 75 percent accuracy.”

Machine learning is fun when it’s in our cookbooks, but as MIT Technology Review explores, possiblities for using it beneficially are growing.


Advice for creators who want to avoid burning out:


21 Genius Ways To Track Your Mental Health

“We rounded up some ~bujo~ layouts perfect for tracking your mood, symptoms, medications, sleep, and anything else that can help you stay on top of or improve your mental health. That said, you don’t have to go full bullet-journal junkie to use these — a lot of them can be done in any old notebook or on a random piece of paper.”

Whether you’re a bullet journal fan or simply someone who’s occasionally willing to put pen to paper for your own benefit, this Buzzfeed list has a lot of great mental health tracking ideas for you.


A post shared by yun.ゆん (@march.lemon) on

It’s spring! Happy Easter, friends.


Important Mental Health Takeaways From the S-Town Podcast

“Listening to the podcast as a journalist, bioethicist and someone with my own mental health challenges, I was left with a lot of questions, including — as Vox’s Aja Romano raises — whether it should have been made in the first place.”

Seems like everyone loves true crime podcasts, but the latest hit in the genre, S-Town, is a little different. There are spoilers here, but it may be worth being forewarned — and if you’ve already listened, this SheKnows article delves into some of the ethical issues.


Breathing’s Link to Calmness and Stress, Revealed

“We take it for granted that breathing and feelings go hand in hand: Deep breaths make us calm, and short, shallow ones signal a sense of panic. This undeniable link is what’s responsible for the success of almost every wellness intervention out there — from yoga to meditation to laughter and running — but why it’s such a powerful connection was never clear until now. By probing the neurological breathing center, scientists discovered the part of the brain that controls the intensity of breathing in the first place.”

Despite doing it constantly, we still don’t know exactly how breathing works — especially as it relates to emotion. Inverse looks at a recent study that explains more.


And with that, we’re off. We’ll be back after the long weekend for another week of great stories, games, interviews and more. Until then, take care of yourselves, friends — and take care of each other. It’s dangerous to go alone.