‘Solo’ Plans to Help Us Uncover Our Feelings About Love

Romance games are finally everywhere. If you’re so inclined, you can load up a visual novel and date anyone or anything. Ninjas. Demons. Pigeons. Cats. Games about love and relationships in real life are less common. They tend to be more reflective — like Cibele, Bientôt l’été, and soon, Solo.

It will be an exploration puzzle game where half the exploration is centered on your ideas about love. The game shapes itself based on answers to questions about love — most importantly, are you in a relationship, or have you ever been in one? Those answers make up the main structure of the game, which goes differently depending on whether you’re part of a couple, coping with heartbreak, or yet to date anyone.

As its creators at Team Gotham describe it, Solo will continue to ask you questions about how you feel about your situation, romance and love, and the experience will shift and adapt to your answers. This sounds like a profoundly introspective game, one that may help players better understand themselves and their relationships.

This is Team Gotham’s pitch:

Solo is a game about love.

About love as fuel, the force that drive us.

It is a universal feeling, but each of us experiences it in a different way. Individually, it holds different meanings depending on a variety of factors such as: culture, gender, sexuality or traumas. That’s why Solo will explore this theme in an introspective way, to have the players identify and reflect on their own experiences.

 

The team is currently raising funds to support Solo’s development through Fig, a curated crowdfunding platform that allows traditional pledges (like Kickstarter) or larger investments. They estimate that the game will be available in Q1 2018 — though as with any crowdfunded game, it’s probably best to expect delays.

A relaxing moment from Solo

A scripted game, no matter how adaptive, can’t take the place of therapy — but it does sound like Solo intends to give players the space and motivation to look at their own feelings from many angles, and maybe learn something about themselves in the process.

[Solo on Fig]

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